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Learn Anytime, Anywhere: Rethinking How Students Earn Credit Beyond School Hours

Date Added: 

March 28, 2012
Learn Anytime, Anywhere

It's time to incorporate into every student's standard high school education the chance to earn credit for learning experiences beyond traditional classrooms.

This is both to attack the drop-out crisis that in some communities sends half the young men of color into the world without a high school degree, but also to provide all students with an appropriate 21st century education. Students need more ways to pursue knowledge and interests beyond their schools' curricula. They need more real world learning applications and opportunities to develop advanced, interactive skills that can't be out-sourced to computers.

Working together, schools and community partners such as youth-serving organizations and science or cultural institutions can develop educationally sound credit-bearing opportunities that meet the needs of a range of high school students from the most accelerated to those who are under-credited and at high risk to quit school.

In this brief, TASC explores how states are providing the kind of flexibility that helps students see education as the path to the future they want for themselves. We offer the following policy recommendations to bring down bureaucratic barriers and encourage schools to collaborate on off-campus learning with community partners such as art and science institutions:

1. Further revise legislation to promote credit flexibility and proficiency-based assessment

2. Clarify teacher-of-record requirements

3. Build incentives for schools to collaborate with community partners

4. Help schools and outside credit-offering institutions find one another

5. Support joint planning and professional development

6. Encourage coordination of funding streams to support credit flexibility

7. Incorporate credit flexibility into high school turnaround strategies

Resource Type: 

Policy Briefs

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